Category Archives: Speaker Night

Apr 6: Dr Adam Muzzin: “The Most Distant Galaxies in the Universe: What we know, and what the James Webb Space Telescope will tell us” ** GO **

We are GO for tonight’s meeting!

Dr Adam Muzzin, York University

The combined power of infrared observatories both in space and from the ground has allowed us to observe extraordinarily distant galaxies. Some of the most distant are observed just a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, when the universe was merely 2% of its current age. Dr. Muzzin will talk about what what observatories like the Hubble Space Telescope have shown us about these exotic young galaxies. He will also introduce the James Webb Space Telescope, NASA’s $9 billion dollar IR-optimized successor to Hubble. Now is an exciting time, as JWST is preparing for launch in Oct 2018. The primary mission of this extremely powerful telescope is to show us the first stars forming in the first galaxies. He will present what we think those very young galaxies might look like.

Adam Muzzin is an assistant professor at York University in Toronto.  His research focuses on galaxy formation and evolution, particularly the high-redshift universe. Most of his work is on how distant galaxies form and evolve, and how that evolution is related to their larger scale environment.  Due to the redshifting of light, studies of distant galaxies almost always involve infrared observations.

More on Dr Adam Muzzin

More on this and other upcoming speaker meetings
(http://earthshineastronomy.ca/events/)

2018 RASC calendars and Explore the Universe Guides will be for sale.

Directions to UTM
(http://www.utm.utoronto.ca/about-us/contact-us/maps-directions)

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2072 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of the Davis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the main floor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

February 9: Dr. Laura Parker: “THE DARK UNIVERSE” *** CANCELLED ***

Our speaker for tonight has had to cancel due to the weather.
We regret to do this again, but we have to cancel the meeting due to anticipated poor turnout and lack of replacement programming.

Dr. Laura Parker, Associate Professor, Dept. of Physics & Astronomy, McMaster University

Observational astronomers use telescopes that look at the furthest distances in the Universe to look back in time and trace the growth of structure in the cosmos. Recent multi-wavelength measurements have helped us to constrain the components that make up the Universe and how those components evolve.

We now know that most of the Universe is made up of dark matter and dark energy, but the nature of these components remains largely unknown. In this talk I will give an overview of the techniques used to map the universe on the largest scales, which have enabled us to measure dark energy and dark matter.

Dr. Laura Parker is an associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at McMaster University. Her research group is interested in questions related to galaxy evolution and observational cosmology. In particular her group is trying to understand the connection between observed galaxy properties and the properties of the environments in which we find them, including the relationship between galaxies and their host dark matter halos.

Dr. Parker completed her PhD in Physics at the University of Waterloo in 2005 and was then a postdoctoral fellow at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in Munich before returning to Canada in 2007 to join the faculty at McMaster.

More on Dr. Laura Parker
(https://www.physics.mcmaster.ca/~lparker/Home.html)

For further information, check here: (http://earthshineastronomy.ca/events/)

2018 RASC calendars and Explore the Universe Guides will be for sale.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2072 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

November 24: Tanya N. Harrison, Ph.D: The Past and Present of Water on Mars

Dr. Tanya Harrison is a “Professional Martian” and the Director of Research for the NewSpace Initiative at Arizona State University. She has worked on multiple NASA Mars missions in science and operations, and specializes in the geology of the Red Planet. Tanya holds a Ph.D. in Geology with a Specialization in Planetary Science and Exploration.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2074 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Oct 27: Randy Attwood – Voyager at 40

*** Due to construction we will meet in room SE2074  (just down the hall) ***
Randy Attwood is the Executive Director of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (RASC). He has been fascinated with astronomy and space exploration since the days of the Apollo missions.

Randy’s talk will focus on the missions of the two Voyager spacecraft that were launched in 1977 – 40 years ago this year. Over a period of 12 years, they explored the four outer planets – Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. The discoveries changed our understanding of our solar system.

This talk will look at the mission and the discoveries as well as some of the challenges Voyager engineers faced in taking late 1960’s spacecraft technology – which lasted only a couple years in space – and extended the lifetime to the required 12 years to complete the mission – and beyond. Now the two spacecraft are leaving the solar system and providing information on the heliopause – the boundary between our solar system and interstellar space.

For more information, see the Earthshine notice: Earthshine

September 22: Catherine Woodford: “The Discovery of Gravitational Waves”

*** Due to construction we will meet in room SE2072 (just down the hall) ***
Catherine Woodford,
University of Toronto

Get an up-close and personal take on the Gravitational Waves discovery that has changed science for the better. Considered the most influential discovery of the century, gravitational wave GW150914 broke records in physics, astronomy, and interferometry – with still more to come. We will talk about what went into the Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) that discovered GW150914 from theoretical, engineering, and computer simulation viewpoints, and discuss the outlooks on the future of gravitational wave astronomy.

Catherine Woodford is a 2nd year PhD candidate in the Physics Department at the University of Toronto and works at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA). Her research falls into two streams: binary black hole simulations and exoplanet simulations. She is a a member of the Simulating eXtreme Spacetimes (SXS) collaboration and the Centre for Planetary Sciences (CPS), as well as a planetarium operator for the Dunlap Institute and outreach fanatic. When she’s not thinking or looking at the sky and what lies beyond, she’s volunteering with the Rotary Club of Toronto, cycling, running, and snowboarding.

For further information, check out the Earthshine notice: Earthshineastronomy

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2072 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

June 23: Prof. Michael De Robertis: “Life Beyond Earth”

*** Due to construction we will meet in room SE2074  (just down the hall) ***
https://i1.rgstatic.net/ii/profile.image/AS%3A278839474311176%401443491919238_l/Michael_De_Robertis.pngProf. Michael De Robertis,
York University

“Is there life elsewhere” is one of the key questions that Astronomers face today. Join us as Prof. Michael De Robertis presents the latest scientific findings and techniques.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2074 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

May 26: Prof. Paul Delaney: Exoplanetary Update: Proxima Centauri b

*** Due to construction we will meet in room SE2074  (just down the hall) ***

Prof. Paul Delaney, York University

Thousands of exoplanets and exoplanetary candidates have been detected suggesting that exoplanets are very common. In 2016 it was discovered that the very closest star to our own Sun, Proxima Centauri b, harbours a planet.

This presentation will summarize the state of exoplanetary research and look at the likelihood of exploring the Proxima Centauri star system in the relatively near future.

For more information, see the Earthshine notice: Earthshine

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2074 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

Mar 24: Dr. Jennifer West: Supernova remnants and how they are connected to our galaxy

Dr. Jennifer West: Supernova remnants and how they are connected to our galaxy.

Jennifer is a Postdoctoral Fellow of the David Dunlap Institute. She uses large radio surveys and radio polarimetry to study magnetic fields in supernova remnants and in the Milky Way Galaxy. She is working with Prof. Bryan Gaensler – who gave us a talk last year – to analyze data from the upcoming POSSUM (Polarisation Sky Survey of the Universe’s Magnetism) survey using the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP).

For more information, visit the Earthshine events page: Earthshine events

Fri Nov 25th – Dr. Dave Dev – “Space Medicine”

SPECIAL RAFFLE PRIZE: SIGNED copy of “An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth” by Chris Hadfield

Come anspace-medicined hear about the myriad hazards to the body in near earth orbit.  Our talk will focus on various disease states from space travel, and the clever ways space medicine tries to mitigate the risks.

 

For more information, see the Earthshine notice: Earthshine

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

Fri Oct 28th – Randy Attwood, “Amateur Astronomy Today – A Status Report”

randyAmateur astronomy has changed drastically over the past 50 years. Telescopes made in the basement have been replaced with high quality instruments capable of performing astronomical research. Those new to astronomy are confronted with computerized telescopes and unfortunately, disappearing skies due to light pollution

There is a great opportunity for amateur astronomers to reach members of the public and promote science literacy and critical thinking. Since young people are attracted to astronomy and space science, we have an opportunity to encourage young people to embrace “STEAM” and pursue careers in science and technology.

Randy Attwood has been looking up for most of his life. His interest in space and astronomy was sparked during the summer of 1969 with the first moon landing. Since then he has observed and photographed the night sky, chased solar eclipses across the globe and witnessed several space shuttle and rocket launches. He often appears in the media to comment on various astronomy and space exploration stories. To recognize his contributions to science public outreach, asteroid 265235 was named Asteroid Attwood in 2012.

For more information, see the Earthshine notice: Earthshine

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!