Category Archives: Uncategorized

Mar 10: Potpourri Night

Potpourri meetings feature a series of short presentations on various astronomy and space topics given by members of the Mississauga Centre. The meeting is open to the public and is free. The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto, Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building.

Host: John Marchese

Presentations

Steve Mallia: Report on the March 4 Moon/Aldebaran Occultation/Graze

Fred Benedikt: My Next Steps in Astrophotography

Dave Dev: Power in the Field

** Break **

Mohammad Shaban: Exoplanet Discovery
Exoplanet Discovery!

John Marchese: Teaming up for the Aug 21 Eclipse
Please come to the meeting and share your plans or, if you don’t have any but want to go, find others to team up with!

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or in the parkade across from the fitness centre south of the Davis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator, follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the main floor). Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

After the meeting, join us at at a local watering hole (location announced during the meeting) for more fun!

Feb 24: Dr. Marianne Mader: Hunting Meteorites at the End of the World

Camping and working in the southernmost, coldest, highest, driest, windiest, least populated continent on Earth is no easy feat! Every year a team of meteorite hunters collects meteorites along the base of the Trans-Antarctic Mountains.

Photo: Brian Boyle

How do these explorers survive? What’s so special about these rocks? And why go all the way to Antarctica to find them? Come hear Dr. Marianne Mader, a participant of the 2012-2013 ANSMET (Antarctic Search for Meteorites) Program talk about her experience and then put yourself in her shoes by practicing a little meteorite hunting of your own!

Dr. Marianne Mader strives to enable curiosity and exploration. As the Managing Director for the Centres of Discovery in Earth & Space and Fossils & Evolution at the ROM, she helps people to understand the Earth, our solar system, and how life evolved over time. With over 12 years of field experience, Marianne has studied some of the oldest rocks on Earth in Greenland, explored impact craters across the globe, and most recently collected meteorites in Antarctica.

She has collaborated with Western University’s Centre for Planetary Science and Exploration, the Canadian Space Agency, NASA, and MDA (Canada’s largest space company) to plan and execute simulated lunar and planetary exploration missions, as well as developing insights into planetary impact cratering processes

Marianne has MScs in both Space Studies and Earth Sciences, and a PhD in planetary science from Western University. She is a Visiting Lecturer at the International Space University.

More on Dr. Marianne Mader

Members Update: New Nov 2016 Messenger Newsletter!

Brian Gibson - Orion Nebula
Brian Gibson – Orion Nebula

Members: keep up to date with the latest news about your club with the latest edition of your Messenger newsletter!

Turn green with envy over Jo’s new 16″ beast, be fascinated by Steve’s article on astrophotography, and be inspired by Brian Gibson’s photo of the Orion nebula!

Available to members only; click on the “MEMBER BENEFITS” menu item and select “MESSENGER NEWSLETTER”.

Fri Oct 28th – Randy Attwood, “Amateur Astronomy Today – A Status Report”

randyAmateur astronomy has changed drastically over the past 50 years. Telescopes made in the basement have been replaced with high quality instruments capable of performing astronomical research. Those new to astronomy are confronted with computerized telescopes and unfortunately, disappearing skies due to light pollution

There is a great opportunity for amateur astronomers to reach members of the public and promote science literacy and critical thinking. Since young people are attracted to astronomy and space science, we have an opportunity to encourage young people to embrace “STEAM” and pursue careers in science and technology.

Randy Attwood has been looking up for most of his life. His interest in space and astronomy was sparked during the summer of 1969 with the first moon landing. Since then he has observed and photographed the night sky, chased solar eclipses across the globe and witnessed several space shuttle and rocket launches. He often appears in the media to comment on various astronomy and space exploration stories. To recognize his contributions to science public outreach, asteroid 265235 was named Asteroid Attwood in 2012.

For more information, see the Earthshine notice: Earthshine

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

Riverwood Tuesday Sep 13th 8:00PM: ** GO ** Mars, Saturn, and the Moon

Join us at Riverwood for a night of free public viewing through our telescopes!

Weather is looking good, so we are GO!

Moon - phone adapterSaturn and Mars are nearing the end of their visit this year, so be sure to see them before they go! We should get a good look at some colourful double stars. Use your phone to get a shot of the crescent Moon through a telescope with one of our phone camera adapters!

There are more details about the event on Earthshine’s site here: Earthshine

We’ll start when it gets dark at 8:00PM.

Here is  a link to Riverwood on Google maps: Riverwood

Riverwood Tues June 14th 9:00PM: Mars, Saturn, Jupiter and the Moon *** GO ***!

Join us at Riverwood for free public viewing through our telescopes!

Moon - phone adapterMars and Saturn are now visible in the evenings, so we sure to get a good look at them. Take a look at mighty Jupiter blazing in the night sky, or get a shot of the crescent Moon through one of our telescopes using your phone with one of our phone camera adapters!

The weather looks perfect! We’ll start when it gets dark at 9:00PM.

Here is  a link to Riverwood on Google maps: Riverwood

Fri May 27th – Dr. Wendy Taylor – Antimatter: From The Subatomic To The Cosmological Scales

WendyJTaylorDr. Wendy Taylor talks about the science of antimatter. What is it? How is it made, trapped, studied and used? And what can it tell us about how the universe works?

Dr. Taylor will produce antimatter during the talk, and beam it out into the audience, just for fun. Not really.

Wendy J. Taylor is Professor of Physics at York University and former Canada Research Chair in Experimental Particle Physics. She is a member of the university’s High Energy Physics Group and leads its ATLAS group.

ATLAS is a key experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN where the Higgs Boson particle was discovered in 2012. Her current research focuses on the search for the hypothetical magnetic monopole particle. Her former research at the Fermilab Tevatron particle collider showed differences in the production of matter and anti-matter in high-energy collisions shedding light on the imbalance in matter and anti-matter in the early universe.

Professor Taylor is a member of the American Physical Society and the Canadian Institute of Particle Physics.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

May 13: Astronomy Potpourri Night

Potpourri meetings feature a series of short presentations on various astronomy and space topics given by members of the Mississauga Centre. The meeting is open to the public and is free. The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto, Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The May 13th meeting features talks on the recent Transit of Mercury, our Astrophotography techniques, and a talk on the shape of the Earth and the metric system.

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or in the parkade across from the fitness centre south of the
 Davis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator, follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the main floor). Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Host: John Golla
Presentations:
Chris Malicki – Report on the May 9 Transit of Mercury.
Lara Awad – Shape of the Earth and the Metric System, part 1.

<** BREAK **>

Lara Awad – Shape of the Earth and the Metric System, part 2.
Steve Mallia – Astrophotography Course.

After the meeting, join us at at a local watering hole (location announced during the meeting) for more fun!