Aug 22: WEDNESDAY Riverwood Public Star Party

***  RAIN DELAYED UNTIL WEDNESDAY AUG 22 ***

The Riverwood Conservancy, Earthshine Astronomy and Space Science Organization and the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada present the CITY STAR PARTY at the RIVERWOOD CONSERVATORY at 8:30 p.m. on WEDNESDAY Aug 22. This event is free.

Moon - phone adapterThere’s a chance you’ll be able to catch Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn in one night!  We should get some views if the smoke from Western Canadian fires isn’t too thick. The Moon should offer some great opportunities for images with your cellphone camera! We should get a good look at some colourful double stars.

Here is  a link to Riverwood on Google maps:  Riverwood

July 25: Riverwood Public Star Party ** GO! ***

***  WE ARE GO! ***

The Riverwood Conservancy, Earthshine Astronomy and Space Science Organization and the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada present the CITY STAR PARTY at the RIVERWOOD CONSERVATORY at 9:00 p.m. on WEDNESDAY July 25 (weather delay from Tuesday). This event is free.

Moon - phone adapterJupiter offers great views as it’s very near opposition – the best time to view the planet.  We should get some views of Saturn this time! The Moon should offer some great opportunities for images with your cellphone camera! We might catch a glimpse of brilliant Venus before it sets, but Mars is up to late, so we’ll miss it this time around.  We should get a good look at some colourful double stars.

Here is  a link to Riverwood on Google maps:  Riverwood

June 20: Riverwood Public Star Party ** DO-OVER **

***  SIGH! WE SHOWED UP BUT SO, UNEXPECTEDLY, DID THE CLOUDS. LETS HAVE A DO-OVER TONIGHT! ***

The Riverwood Conservancy, Earthshine Astronomy and Space Science Organization and the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada present the CITY STAR PARTY at the RIVERWOOD CONSERVATORY at 9:00 p.m. on WEDNESDAY June 20. This event is free.

Moon - phone adapterJupiter offers great views as it’s very near opposition – the best time to view the planet. The Moon should offer some great opportunities for images with your cellphone camera! We might catch a glimpse of brilliant Venus before it sets, but Mars and Saturn are up much later, so we’ll miss them this time around.  We should get a good look at some colourful double stars.

Here is  a link to Riverwood on Google maps:  Riverwood

June 8: Dr. John Moores – “Solar System Exploration – An Update”

Dr. John Moores of York University will give a talk titled “Solar System Exploration – An Update”.

John is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Space Science and Engineering at York University and a Participating Scientist on the Curiosity Rover. He trained on MER in 2004 and contributed to the 2005 Huygens Mission to Titan and the 2008 Phoenix Mission to the Martian Arctic: Here is more information about John.

Over the last few years, rovers, orbiters and flyby missions have improved our understanding of our own solar system. At Mars, Curiosity and Maven have revolutionized our understanding of present and ancient Mars. Further out, Dawn has given us our first view of the hydrated asteroid Ceres. Meanwhile, Juno has shown us the surprising shape of the Jovian poles. And, of course, New Horizons at Pluto has uncovered the Solar System’s heart.

In the coming years, the tradition at Mars will be carried on by the Trace Gas Orbiter and Insight missions. Europa Clipper will take a closer look at Jupiter’s most enigmatic moon. Our first mission to the Jovian Trojans (Lucy) and to an iron asteroid (Psyche) will take place. New Horizons will arrive at the most distant object in the solar system ever visited. Throughout, we are gaining an underlying understanding of how planets work, setting us up to make discoveries in planetary systems around distant stars throughout our galaxy..

More on this and other events: Earthshine Astronomy

Directions to UTM
(http://www.utm.utoronto.ca/about-us/contact-us/maps-directions)

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2072 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of the Davis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the main floor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

May 25: Potpourri Night & Auction!

Come out for the excitement of our yearly auction of all things astronomical!

Potpourri meetings feature a series of short presentations on various astronomy and space topics given by members of the Mississauga Centre. The meeting is open to the public and is free. The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto, Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2074 in the William Davis Building.

Host: Simon Claughton

PRESENTATIONS

FOURTH ANNUAL AUCTION with Simon Claughton as our auctioneer
* Only members can sell
* Anybody can donate items to the club
* Anybody can purchase
* No pre-registration required – just bring the items and see Simon before
the meeting starts

** Break ** 2018 RASC calendars and Explore the Universe Guides will be for sale **

Gord Williams: Solar System Demo for Kids
John Marchese: Starfest 2018 Preview

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or in the parkade across from the fitness centre south of the Davis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator, follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the main floor). Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

After the meeting, join us at at a local watering hole (location announced during the meeting) for more fun!

May 11: Sara Mazrouei: Earth’s Battered Moon

Sara Mazrouei, Phd Candidate In Planetary Geology, University Of Toronto will give a talk titled “Earth’s Battered Moon: Understanding how Impacts from Space have Shaped our Planet”.

Just like the Earth, the Moon is about 4.5 billion years old. It has been and continues to be constantly bombarded by meteorites. Some suggest that this rate of bombardment has remained constant in the past couple of billion years. The Moon’s surface without any substantial atmosphere or tectonic activity serves as a time capsule, helping us detangle Earth’s history. The only way to see if the bombardment rate has changed is to have an age for every single crater, an extremely difficult task using traditional crater dating methods. Recently, it has been shown that the rockiness of large craters’ ejecta provides an alternative means for estimating the ages of Copernican craters (younger than roughly one billion years old). This talk will focus on exploring the rate of bombardment in the past billion years.

Sara was one of the organisers of the inaugural Women in Planetary Science and Exploration conference, held at the University of Toronto in February: Women in Planetary Science and Exploration. She has been interested in outer space since an early age. “To pursue my passion, I enrolled in the Space Science program at York University and continued to do my master’s there. That is where I became more interested in planetary science. After finishing my master’s, I worked as a Young Graduate Trainee at the European Space Agency for a year and then started my doctorate at U of T. I’m doing my PhD at the department of Earth Sciences, using remote sensing techniques to understand the age of impact craters on the Moon. From that data, we can extrapolate the frequency and scale of meteorite impacts on the Earth over time, which is an important part of our planetary history.”

Sara Mazrouei’s thesis focuses on the cratering rate on the Moon. She is a science team member on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter’s Diviner team. Sara received her MSc. from York University, where she studied rocks on asteroid Itokawa using data from the Japanese Hayabusa mission. In between her master’s and PhD studies, Sara worked at the European Space Agency, calibrating radio science data from the Venus Express.

More on this and other events: Earthshine Astronomy

2018 RASC calendars and Explore the Universe Guides will be for sale.

Directions to UTM
(http://www.utm.utoronto.ca/about-us/contact-us/maps-directions)

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2072 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of the Davis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the main floor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!